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The Best Cuts of Meat for Pot Roast

If you want to create a mouthwatering pot roast, choosing the right cut of beef is essential. But with so many options, it can be overwhelming to know where to start. Our guide will help you find the best cut of meat for your pot roast, and what to expect from each cut.

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Pot roast on a white plate.
What is the best cut of meat for pot roast?

Pot roast is a classic comfort food that is perfect for a cozy dinner at home. Whether you are making a pot roast in your slow cooker, Instant Pot, or Dutch oven, the key to creating a delicious and tender pot roast is choosing the right cut of beef.

Getting the cut of meat right for your pot roast can make the difference between a melt-in-the-mouth tender roast, or dry overcooked tasteless beef.

There are a few things to look for when selecting a cut of meat for a pot roast, a few cuts that are ideal for this style of cooking, and a few that you will definitely want to avoid.

Choosing the right cut for your pot roast

When it comes to choosing the right cut of beef for a pot roast, it’s important to understand what happens to the meat during the slow-cooking process.

When meat is slow-cooked in a pot roast, any connective tissue and fat in the meat begin to break down because of the slow, moist cooking method, resulting in tender, fall-apart beef.

Economical cuts of meat, such as chuck and brisket, typically have more connective tissue and fat than the pricier cuts, making them tough. They can be tough, chewy, and unappetizing if grilled or pan-roasted.

However, they are perfect for a slow cooked pot roast. The connective tissue and fat in a tough cut of beef will melt during the slow cooking process, making the meat tender and flavorful.

Lean, tender cuts, such as sirloin, tri-tip or tenderloin, are more expensive and have less fat and connective tissue, making them better suited for quick cooking methods like grilling. They do not benefit from the slow cooking process in the same way, and will end up overcooked, dry, and lacking in flavor if cooked in a pot roast.

In general, the best cuts of beef for pot roast are those that are well-marbled with fat and have a good amount of connective tissue. These cuts will become tender and juicy when cooked slowly, making for a delicious and satisfying meal.

The best cuts of beef for pot roast

Here are our picks for the best cuts of beef to use for a pot roast, and what to expect from them:

Chuck roast

Probably the best choice to use is chuck roast. This cut comes from the shoulder of the cow and is known for its marbling, which adds flavor and moisture to the meat. Bolar blade roast is part of the chuck, and also an excellent choice for a pot roast.

It is best cooked slowly to allow the connective tissue to break down and create a tender final result.

It’s a popular choice for pot roast because it becomes fall-apart tender when cooked slowly.

Round roast/ rump roast

Rouind roast (top round, or bottom round) is a lean cut of beef that is often used for pot roast. It is also known as rump roast, or silverside.

It comes from the hind leg of the cow and is best cooked slowly to allow the connective tissue to break down and create a tender final result. Round roast is leaner than chuck, but still has a good amount of flavor.

Brisket

This cut comes from the breast area and is known for its tough, but flavorful meat. It’s a popular choice for slow-cooked dishes like pot roast, as it becomes tender and juicy when cooked for a long time. It has a strong, beefy flavor that is enhanced by the slow cooking process.

Short rib

Short rib is another tasty option for pot roast. This cut comes from the rib area of the cow and is known for its rich, beefy flavor. It is a flavorful and succulent cut of meat that is well-suited for a pot roast. Because short rib contains a high amount of fat and connective tissue, it benefits greatly from the slow, moist cooking method used in pot roasting.

Shank

Shank is a flavorful cut of beef that is often used for pot roast. It comes from the lower leg of the cow and is known for its rich, beefy flavor.

One of the advantages of using shank for a pot roast is that it is a relatively inexpensive cut of beef. This means you can save money on your grocery bill without sacrificing flavor or tenderness.

What cuts to avoid

When it comes to choosing a cut of meat for your pot roast, you will want to avoid using certain cuts that are better suited for other cooking methods.

Lean tender cuts of beef are not well-suited for a pot roast. Because they are lean and tender they do not contain enough connective tissue and fat to benefit from the slow, moist cooking method used in pot roasting. As a result, they may end up being dry and lacking in flavor.

Some cuts that are not so well-suited to slow-cooking are:

  • Tenderloin/ filet mignon
  • Flank steak
  • Strip steak
  • Sirloin

These cuts are best suited for grilling, pan-frying, roasting, or air frying.


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I’m Eliza, busy mom, home cook, and blogger. My goal is to help everyone cook good food. Whether you are short on time, skills, or motivation, there is something here for you! We have dozens of quick and easy recipes for dinner, lunch, side dishes, and more. Our recipes use everyday ingredients, for quick delicious meals your family will love! Read more…

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